Low-Carb Bread Machine Bread

One of the biggest complaints I, and many others, have about Keto Bread is that it tends to taste too eggy.  I’ve been on a mission to eliminate that and discovered that, with my new bread machine, I can bake #KetoFriendly, #EggFree, loaves of bread. 

Of course, buying a new bread machine means yet another tool I need to find a home for in my #StorageChallengedKitchen.  But #ThisGirlLovesToEat, so I’ll find a corner somewhere. 😉

My machine is a Cuisinart Convection Breadmaker and does have a low-carb setting, so that is a bonus.

Keto Bread Machine White Bread

  • 2+1/2 tsp Bread Machine Instant Yeast
  • 1 + 1/3 Cup 90º F Tap Water
  • 2 TBLS Sugar
  • 1/4 Cup Neutral Oil (Vegetable or Canola) – unless you want the flavor in your bread, then you can use Olive Oil (I like to use a blend of Olive-Avocado Oil)
  • 3 tsp Vital Wheat Gluten
  • 3 Cups/300 g (weigh it if you can) Carbalose® Lo-Carb Flour (I have used Bob’s Paleo Flour as well)
  • Salt or other seasonings as desired (I always add a bit of salt)

Using a paper towel, lightly oil the inside of your bread machine pan and the kneading paddle.  Plug in your bread machine (but do not preheat), add your yeast, sugar and warm water to the pan and close the machine lid.  Set a timer for 12 minutes to allow your yeast to activate (start bubbling).

As soon as your yeast is nice and foamy, add (in this order) your oil, the wheat gluten, any spices you are using, and the flour.

Close your lid and set the machine to Low Carb setting (if it has one) or bake at basic mode for a 1.5 pound loaf.

**Tip:  To keep your loaf from having a hole in the middle, when the rise cycle starts, remove the paddle and center your loaf back in the pan without handling it too much.

Allow loaf to cool in the pan then slice into 12 slices.

Nutrition Information Per Slice (with Canola Oil)

    • Calories   120
    • Protein     8.25 g
    • Carbs        4.83 g
    • Fat             7.42 g

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Homemade Red Wine Vinegar

Realizing that #leftoverwine is an oxymoron, the occasion did present when a high quality bottle was opened at the end of a multi-bottle evening and not finished, then said bottle was put into the wine cellar and forgotten for a week past it’s drinking window. Shit!

Time to make some red wine vinegar! I left the bottle, corked, in the dark, cool cellar for an additional month then set to starting my kitchen #chemistryexperiment.

Vintage Red Wine Vinegar

  • Up to 750 ml leftover Red Wine of any variety – in this case, I used: 3/4 bottle Eighty Four Wines 2013 Malbec out of Napa, CA + about 1/4 bottle Bodega Y Vinedos Catena 2019 Malbec out of Argentina
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) 3% Hydrogen Peroxide (if wine contains sulfites)
  • 1 cup (237 ml) Unchlorinated Water
  • 1/2 cup (118 ml) Raw, Unfiltered, Unpasteurized Vinegar, or a Vinegar Mother – I used Bragg Organic Raw-Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar With the Mother

Pour the wine into a dry, sanitized, wide-mouthed, sealable (canning) jar that holds at least a quart. If the wine contains sulfites (it will say so on the back of the bottle), stir in the hydrogen peroxide and let the wine sit for about a minute to neutralize them. Stir in the water with a wooden spoon.

Stir in the raw vinegar well to oxygenate the wine.

Cover the jar with either tightly-woven, quadrupled cheesecloth or a piece of muslin, even a thick paper towel, securing with rubber band/string/a screw on metal canning band, or, like I used, 😉 a zip tie to keep fruit flies out. You can cover it with a paper coffee filter for extra protection from fruit flies if desired. The jar needs to breathe (vent its Carbon dioxide) so do not, under any circumstances, put the metal inner jar canning lid or glass clamped vacuum lid on to seal.

Place your jar on the counter, out of direct light, or in a cupboard, where the temperature stays between 65° and 75°F. The longer you leave it alone to fully develop it’s acidity, especially if you have blended more than one type of wine, the better. Ideally, leave it alone a minimum of one month before checking your acidity level. Your ph should be 4.0 or below.

Bottle half of the vinegar, in a pressure resistant bottle, leaving headspace and replace with the same amount of wine for another batch. Or, you can bottle it all, storing the mother (1/2 C) for another batch or to share with a friend to make her own.

Amazon carries many suitable bottles for storing vinegar

The vinegar can be used immediately (stored in the refrigerator if you like the flavor as it is) or aged longer in your cupboard or on the cool counter top to allow it to mellow further and the flavors to develop more fully.

  • Troubleshooting: Most fermenting problems with vinegar come from trying to ferment in temperatures that are too warm for the fermentation process. Try to keep your jars in a room that’s between 55 and 75°F.
  • Surface growth: If you see anything “scummy” starting to grow on your vinegar while it’s fermenting, scoop off the surface growth. If it smells fine, it is fine.
  • Over-Fermenting: If your vinegar develops an awful smell (like rotting garbage), toss it out. If it smells a little funky (like vinegar), it’s probably fine.
  • Mold Growth: If you’re having problems with mold growing on the vinegar (not simply white scum on the top), toss out the vinegar. Next time, make sure your vinegar is fermenting in a room that’s not above 75 degrees, and is in a place with good airflow.

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Costs Going Up Wine Pours Shrinking!

Photo Credit: Brian Zak/NY Post

I came across this article from the New York Post and was struck by just how true it is here on the West Coast too! Are you feeling the same about higher prices & smaller wine pours where you are?

Article written by Beth Landman, “You’re Not crazy, wine pours are shrinking” appeared June 23, 2022 in the New York Post

When international investor Brian Hogan took an important client to a favorite Midtown restaurant last month, he hoped to impress him. His guest ordered a Chablis by the glass rather than the bottle, and the sommelier poured it with due deference.

But, when the usually mild-mannered client looked down at his glass, he was shocked by the minuscule size of the serving. He summoned the manager and asked him to bring over a measuring cup.

“He thought the pour was ridiculous and offensive,” Hogan said. “When he measured, it turned out to be only 4 ounces.” The manager quickly delivered more wine to the glass, along with a profuse apology.

Inflation has hit the bottle. All over the city, from taverns to fine restaurants, diners are doing double takes as they receive reduced pours of wine at increased prices. A standard bottle of wine contains 25.4 ounces — meaning a generous 6-ounce pour will yield four glasses, a standard 5-ounce glass will deliver five and a measly 4 ounces will eke out six. Diners say they’re increasingly being served paltry pours, and industry insiders confirm their suspicions.

“I worked for Danny Meyer and we always gave 6 ounces,” said a sommelier at a popular new downtown restaurant. “When I got here I was quickly corrected and instructed to pour only 5.”

A somm at another Manhattan hot spot confided that “During COVID, we were told to make sure we got five glasses out of a bottle, rather than the four we were used to getting.”

A spokesperson for Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group confirmed that his restaurants still pour 6 ounces. At Isabelle’s Osteria and Barbounia in the Flatiron, they’re also sticking to 6 ounces.

“All our wine costs went up … but we felt that customers will forgive you if you overcook their meat a bit, but will not forgive you if you skimp,” said Vladimir Kolotyan, a partner in both restaurants. “So we added one dollar to some of the glass prices and left some the same, but never touched the size.”

The stingy servings are creating awkward situations. 

An Upper West Side entertainment attorney had some explaining to do to his ex-wife after she saw a bill from his dinner with their young adult children. 

“She was disturbed by the number of wine glasses consumed, but I explained to her that we actually drank the same amount of alcohol we usually do; we just had to order more glasses,” said the man, who asked to remain anonymous for personal reasons.

Even those in the wine industry, while sympathetic to restaurant’s rising costs, are disturbed by the trend. 

“I’m willing to pay for quality and I feel shortchanged when I receive a small pour,’’ said Mark Fang, a 41-year-old wine blogger and certified sommelier who lives in Hell’s Kitchen. He recently dined at Marea and ordered an $18 glass of Grüner Veltliner that he estimated was a mere 4 ounces. 

“Normally I get only one glass of wine, but this time the pour was so small it didn’t last past the appetizer,” he said. “I like to enjoy wine with my entree, so I ordered a second glass … [in general] I know what bottles cost, and that hurts.”

“I’m blown away by how small the pours are.’’

Karen Harris

(A spokesperson for Marea’s Altamarea restaurant group said: “The standard operating procedure for pouring a glass of wine at Marea is 5 ounces. We do acknowledge that there is an occasional margin of error to take into account.”)

Karen Harris, 59, who lives on the Upper East Side and is an account executive for a wine importer and distributor, said that her entire portfolio has increased in price for the first time in four years. Still, she’s stunned by shrinking servings.

“I go to some places and think, ‘Are they serious?’” she said. “I’m blown away by how small the pours are.’’

Many restaurateurs insist that part of the problem is the trend towards using larger, better stemware that dwarfs the appearance of the wine.

A standard bottle of wine contains 25.4 ounces — meaning a generous 6-ounce pour will yield 4 glasses, a standard 5-ounce glass will deliver 5 and a measly 4 ounces will eke out 6. Above, a 6-ounce pour (left) and a 4-ounce pour.
Brian Zak/NY Post

Maximilian Riedel, CEO and president of glassware company Riedel, thinks COVID isolation is also to blame. “This is an issue of perception,’’ he told The Post. “For the past two years, we have all [been] helping ourselves to what’s in [our] cellars. Now that we are returning to in-person dining, a server’s measured pour likely appears more restrained.’’ To ensure servers hit their mark, Riedel glasses have a subtle indicator in the curve of the glass at what the company sees as the ideal pour: 5 ounces.

But some restaurateurs insist that 5 ounces isn’t enough for their demanding clientele. 

“I hear that in the city they are lowering servings and jacking up prices,’’ said Zach Erdem, owner of Southampton hot spots 75 Main and Blu Mar. “Here, if you give people 5 ounces, they will scream at you!’’

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Long Live Langer’s Deli!

Langer’s Number 19 Pastrami Sandwich

This article appeared in today’s Los Angeles Times – Nicholas Goldberg says it more perfectly than I ever could, so enjoy his ode to 75 years of the institution known as Langer’s Deli!

They’ve been making the world’s best pastrami sandwiches for 75 years. Can they keep it up? BY NICHOLAS GOLDBERG | COLUMNIST JUN 20, 2022 | 3:00 AM LOS ANGELES TIMES

The long, slow decline of the Jewish delicatessen has been bemoaned and lamented for many years. In the early 1930s, there were more than 1,500 kosher delis and many more non-kosher ones in the five boroughs of New York alone, according to city records. In recent years, the estimate fell to 150 in all of North America. That’s why it is a cause for celebration that Langer’s delicatessen, the venerable pastrami emporium on 7th and Alvarado near MacArthur Park, marked another milestone birthday this weekend. The restaurant, which opened with space for 12 customers in June 1947, is now 75 years old. Langer’s is, of course, a Los Angeles institution. In 1991, Jonathan Gold wrote in The Times: “The fact is inescapable: Langer’s probably serves the best pastrami sandwich in America.” In 2002, Nora Ephron went farther, declaring unequivocally in the New Yorker that Langer’s made the finest hot pastrami sandwich in the world. She described it as “soft but crispy, tender but chewy, peppery but sour, smoky but tangy.” And, if I may be so bold, my recent lunch of matzo ball soup and hot pastrami on rye with sauerkraut confirmed — to my satisfaction, anyway — that those assessments still hold. Of course, if you don’t want pastrami, there are alternatives. You can have the corned beef (Mimi Sheraton called it “excellent” in a 42-year-old review that still hangs, fading now, in the restaurant’s window). Or blintzes, kasha varnishkes, latkes, a bowl of borscht or a knish with gravy. For dessert, noodle kugel. I guess you could also order the hamburger or even — don’t tell the ancestors, please — a ham and cheese sandwich. But that would be foolish. Ephron was snide about the decor. “It is decorated, although ‘decorated’ is probably not the word that applies, in tufted brown vinyl,” she wrote. That was 20 years ago, and that’s pretty much how it still looks today. She noted that Langer’s always seems to be just barely hanging on. That’s also still true. The sufferings of Jewish delis over the years have been legion, the challenges monumental: There’s the passing of the shtetl generation and its children. The assimilation of its grandchildren. The dispersal of the Jewish population from the cities to suburbs (and, in the case of Langer’s, from Westlake-MacArthur Park to the San Fernando Valley and the Westside). Rising rents. The climbing costs of ingredients. The tut-tutting of cardiologists everywhere, what with all the fat, carbohydrates and salt. More recently, the COVID closures. And now, a new burst of inflation. The price of a pastrami sandwich at Langer’s rose recently to $22, a number that even its owner, Norm Langer, concedes is meshuga. “Is half a pound of meat, two slices of rye bread and a pickle worth $22?” he asks. “I don’t know. But I’ve got to make ends meet.” When the restaurant first opened, a pastrami sandwich cost about 35 cents. When The Times mentioned the deli in 1973, the price had risen to $1.75. In 2002, it was $8.50. Langer is 77 years old. He says he has no plans to retire. “I get up in the morning, I’ve got to go somewhere,” he says. “Everybody needs a place to go.” The restaurant was opened by his father, Al Langer of Newark, N.J., who’d gotten his start in delis years earlier when his mother sent him to work to raise money to help pay for his $35 bar mitzvah. In 1947, Al was living in L.A., was recently out of the service and had saved $500. He borrowed a few thousand more. In those days, the Westlake-MacArthur Park neighborhood had a big, middle-class Jewish population. At one point the restaurant had so much business it stayed open nights until 3 a.m. Now it closes at 4 p.m. In the 1980s, The Times wrote endless stories about the troubles facing the deli because of the changing neighborhood, including one histrionic article about MacArthur Park headlined “Winos, Dopers, Crime Overrun City Landmark.” But Langer’s hung on. The restaurant got a needed boost in 1993 when Metro’s Red Line opened, with a subway station just a block and a half away. Crowds flocked in from downtown. “I saw 500 people lined up to get into Langer’s and I told Norm, ‘It was worth spending $1.2 billion to keep you in business,’ ” said then-County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, a regular. In L.A. today the delis that still exist include Canter’s, which opened in 1931 in Boyle Heights and only later moved to its location on Fairfax. Also Art’s Deli, Nate ’n Al’s and Wexler’s. There’s Brent’s Deli. To name just a few. But they keep closing down. Izzie’s in Santa Monica shut its doors in May. Greenblatt’s in West Hollywood closed in 2021 after 95 years. New delis have opened, in some cases with modern, sustainable or health-conscious twists on the classic cuisine. Less shabby, less irascible, they’re gambling that deli food can be gentrified and rejuvenated. But pastrami, let’s face it, is an acquired taste. So are creamed herring, chicken liver, tongue, whitefish salad and other old country staples. The bagel may be firmly embedded in the American food pantheon, but traditional Ashkenazi deli fare of the sort that flourished in the years after the great Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe is unquestionably endangered. And with it a tangible link to the culinary past. A connection to the forefathers. A piece of the collective culture. The good news is that reports of its extinction have proved premature so far, as Langer’s demonstrates. So rather than rend my garments, I’ll make the most of it while I can (and hope my heart holds out).

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I Guess Adult Pickles Are a Thing

Leave millions of people in isolation, with time to fill, an internet full of ideas + the ability to get anything you need to bring weird ideas to life shipped to you, and what do you get?

Apparently a whole lot of drunk people eating pickles! I’ve seen whiskey pickles, tequila pickles, Old Bay and vodka pickles, beer and pickles, apple infused vodka pickles, and even candied pickle pops made with vodka & Kool-Aid. I’m not a trendy, #TikTok kind of girl, but I’m up for a challenge, the boys are coming over for Father’s Day & I can’t wait to give this a try so I can see their faces when they take their first bites.

Drunken Pickles

2 C Small Pickles or Gherkins

1 C Pickle Juice

1 C Good Bourbon – I like Makers Mark

5 Sprigs of Dill

A Few Dashes of Hot Sauce – I like Frank’s Red Hot

If You like a little more kick, add a few shakes Red Pepper Flakes

4” Cocktail Skewers

  1. In a medium bowl, combine pickles with pickle juice, whiskey, dill and hot sauce. Refrigerate for at least an hour. I plan to leave them overnight.
  2. Drain and skewer pickles. Serve.

Recipe courtesy of Lena Abraham, Senior Food Editor, Delish Magazine, June 30, 2017; Photo credit: Chelsea Lupkin

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Pressure Cooker Bourbon Short Ribs

It’s time to ditch the #Covid15, so back to cooking at home instead of Doordashing dinners I go!

These short ribs pressure cook to a fork tender, falling off the bone, delicious finish in under an hour and are great with a simple salad and cauliflower mash. I used ground Chipotle, but you can use any pepper spice you prefer. I prefer it smokier with the bourbon.

Bourbon Short Ribs

  • 2 1/2 Pounds Bone-in Short Ribs (About 6)
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Olive Oil
  • 1 Medium Onion, Chopped
  • 1/2 Cup Bourbon
  • 1 TBLS Paprika
  • 2 tsp Ground Cayenne, Adobo, or Chipotle (1 tsp if you want it milder)
  • 3 TBLS Granulated Sugar (you can use a sugar substitute if you’re strictly counting every carb)
  • 3 TBLS Balsamic Vinegar
  • 6 Cloves Garlic (Iused 1 TBLS jarred chopped garlic)
  • 3-4 Sprigs Fresh Thyme
  • 1 Can Beef Consommé
  • 1TBLS Cornstarch + 1 TBLS Cold Water mixed together

Cooking Directions:

  • Fill a large bowl or pot with cold water. Immerse the short ribs, and rinse the ribs in the cold water to wash off excess blood and bone dust.
  • Drain and pat dry the short ribs with paper towels. Generously sprinkle salt & pepper on all the ribs, on both sides.
  • Switch on the Instant Pot to the saute setting on high. When the instant pot is hot, pour in about 2 tbsp of oil. When the oil is hot, place about 3 – 4 short ribs in the instant pot to caramelize or to sear. It’s important not to overcrowd the bottom in order to get nice caramelization on your short ribs. Sear the short ribs on all sides, about 2 – 3 minutes per side. Place the caramelized short ribs on a plate.
  • Repeat with the rest of the short ribs.
  • Place the onion in the pot, and add the boubon. De-glaze the bottom of the instant pot to make sure that all of the caramelized bits on the bottom are mixed with the bourbon (de-glazing is an important step, so don’t skip it). Add the paprika, cayenne pepper, sugar, balsamic vinegar, garlic, and thyme.
  • Bring just to a boil, then turn off your instant pot.
  • Place the short ribs, fat side down, back in the instant pot.
  • Pour the consommé over the short ribs. Close the instant pot. Choose the manual pressure function and set it to high. Cook the short ribs for 45 minutes, followed by a 10 – 15 minute natural release.
  • Gently remove the short ribs on to bowl, and turn the saute function back on to thicken the liquid in the instant pot.
  • Dissolve the cornstarch in the water and add it to the sauce in the instant pot. Mix it in and bring it to a simmer until the liquid has thickened. Taste and season the liquid with more salt, pepper, or balsamic vinegar, if needed. Turm the Instant Pot off and put the short ribs back into the instant pot to coat with the sauce.

Serve over your cauliflower mash (I grilled some summer squash) with the sauce. #ThisGirlLovesToEat

Gluten Free Snickerdoodle Bread

Paleo-Snickerdoodle-Loaf (3)One of my favorite ingredients in #MyKetoKitchen is Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Baking Flour.  It thickens sauces and my favorite egg casserole and, being #KetoFriendly, it allows me to enjoy baked goods, pancakes, and waffles without sacrificing taste or loading up on dreaded carbs.  This recipe can be baked in the oven or using a bread machine that has a #QuickBread or #Cake baking cycle, like my #CuisinartConvectionBreadMaker does.  #ThisGirlLovesToEat

Gluten Free Snickerdoodle Bread

  • 3+1/2 Cups (322 g) Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Baking Flour
  • 2 TBLS Premium Vital Wheat Gluten
  • 5 TBLS Truvia
  • 1 TBLS Ground Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 3 Eggs
  • 1/3 Cup Whole or Almond Milk
  • 1/4 Cup Melted Butter or Coconut Oil
  • 1 tsp Vanilla
  • Aerosol Cooking Spray (Canola Oil)

Topping – Combine in a small dish and set aside

  • 1 TBLS Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Ground Cinnamon

If Cooking in a loaf pan in the oven: Spray the pan with cooking spray and preheat the oven to 325° F.

If using your breadmaker:  Spray the cooking pan with the cooking spray and set the bread machine to the settings for a 1+1/2 pound loaf (at your desired degree of crust darkness) and Quick Bread/Cake setting.

In a medium bowl, combine your dry ingredients and whisk them together until well combined.  Set aside.  In a second bowl, combine the wet ingredients.

If cooking in the oven:  Add the dry mixture to the wet mixture and stir well to combine. Transfer batter to the prepared loaf pan and smooth evenly.  Sprinkle as much of the topping over the top of the loaf (I use less than half).  Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean, about 60 minutes.  Let cool in the pan, on a wire rack, then remove from pan and serve.

If using your breadmaker:  Put the wet ingredients in first, then add the dry ingredients.  Close the lid and press start.  After the dough has mixed for 2-3 minutes, using a rubber spatula, stir in any of the flour mixture that remains on the edges and underneath the loaf.  When the final mix is complete, remove the dough paddle, if desired, and reshape your loaf to fill in the hole in the middle.  Sprinkle however much of the topping you want on your loaf, close the lid and allow the baking cycle to complete.  When the cycle ends, check the doneness of your loaf by inserting a wooden skewer/toothpick into the middle.  If it comes out clean, you are good to go.  If not, you can add time manually, 5 minutes at a time, checking doneness midway through.  Let cool in the pan, on a wire rack, then remove from pan, slice into 10 slices then slice again in half for 20 pieces, and serve.

I like to keep this dense, flavorful bread in the refrigerator, in a sealed container and serve it with some cream cheese to add some fat (for my Keto followers).

Nutrition Information (Makes 20 Servings)

  • 89  Calories
  • 9g  Carbohydrates
  • 3g  Fat
  • 3g  Protein

Cheesy Poblano Chicken Bake

PoblanoChickenBrocBakePlaying around during #Keto meal prep this weekend, I came up with a high protein/low carb chicken and broccoli casserole that’s a great dinner with a salad or perfect for a grab-and-go lunch that can easily be reheated in the microwave at work!  #ThisGirlLovesToEat

Cheesy Poblano Chicken Bake

  • 1 Poblano Chili, seeded & finely chopped
  • 4 TBLS Butter, divided
  • 8 oz Fresh Broccoli Florets, trimmed
  • 1.75 lb (28 oz) Chicken Breast (uncooked and cut into appx 2 x 2 chunks)
  • 2 TBLS Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Baking Flour
  • 1/2 Cup Water
  • 1 Cup Half & Half
  • 6 oz Sharp Cheddar Cheese, shredded
  • 1/4 tsp Black Pepper
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Garlic Powder

Preheat the oven to 350º F and spray the bottom of a 9 x 11 inch Pyrex baking dish with olive oil cooking spray.

In a microwave steamer, cook the raw broccoli on high power for 4 minutes.  Layer the cooked broccoli into the Pyrex baking dish.

Using the same steamer, cook the chicken in the microwave for 5 – 6 minutes, just until cooked thru.  Remove the chicken to your stand mixer with the paddle attachment and shred the chicken on low (about 2 minutes).  Layer the chicken on top of the  broccoli layer.

In a medium saucepan, combine 2 TBLS of the butter and the chopped Poblano pepper and saute until the peppers are soft and the butter has turned green (5-7 minutes).  Add the remaining 2 TBLS butter, salt, pepper and garlic powder, and, once melted, stir in the flour.  Cook while stirring constantly for about 2 minutes, over medium heat, until the mixture is bubbling and very well combined.

Add milk then water, and whisk until smooth, scraping roux out of the corners of the saucepan.  Increase heat to medium high, bring to a simmer, stirring constantly until the mixture thickens, 2 to 4 minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in the cheese until smooth.  Add the paprika.

Pour the cheese sauce over the top of the chicken layer and spread to the edges of the pan.

Bake 20-30 minutes, or until sauce is bubbling and the casserole is warm throughout.

Nutrition Information (6 Servings)

  • 350 Calories
  • 20 g Fat
  • 2 g Carbohydrates
  • 37 g Protein

 

What The F…?

This article from Epicurious.com needs no more introduction or explanation. #MindBlown

Leave the Peel on When You Use a Garlic Press

Not peeling garlic takes this gadget from unnecessary to unparalleled.

BY DAVID TAMARKIN

June 11, 2015

A good cook is an open-minded, curious cook. But when I saw my friend take out his garlic press, my face puckered into a judgemental scowl. I was throwing some serious shade.

“Don’t worry, don’t worry,” my friend said. “I know how to use it properly.”

Poor thing. He thought I was doubting his garlic press skills. Dude didn’t realize that I was hating on the mere presence—the idea! the existence!—of the press itself.

What my friend did next wiped the judgemental expression from my face.

First, he opened the press and inserted an unpeeled clove of garlic.

Photos by Chelsea Kyle, food styling by Katherine Sacks

Then he closed the press and squeezed on the handle, extracting golden, fragrant minced garlic.

“What’s your problem?” my friend asked. My expression had gone from shady to incredulous.

“The peel!” I said. “Where’s the peel?”

My friend opened the press. The peel, of course, was inside, emptied of garlic but barely torn. None of it, not even a speck, had gotten mixed up with the minced garlic on the cutting board.

That’s when my feelings about the garlic press changed. Prior to this moment, I’d seen the press as a clunky and unnecessary tool. If I was going to spend the time to peel a clove of garlic, I may as well take the extra 30 seconds to run my knife over it, right?

But now that I knew that you didn’t have to peel the garlic? This was a game changer. Not to mention a time saver. Visions of garlic mojo—not to mention Epi’s Food Editor Rhoda’s garlic oil—raced through my head. Mince 8 cloves of garlic? Make it 20. I don’t care. I have a garlic press!

Actually, no I don’t.

I pointed to my friend’s press. “Can I borrow that?”

That was weeks ago. I still haven’t returned it.

  • I, for one, will be finding an excuse to dig out my #GarlicPress today! #ThisGirlLovesToEat

Holiday Bites: Sugar Free Peanut Butter Cups

I am a Reese’s Mini Peanut Butter Cups, but they are Hell on the diet…these are Keto Friendly & give me a little less guilt.  #ThisGirlLovesToEat

Sugar Free Peanut Butter Cups

  • 9 oz Bag Lily’s 55% Cacao Sugar Free Chocolate Chips
  • 3/4 Cup No Sugar Added Peanut Butter
  • 2 TBLS Crisco Solid Shortening
  • 2 TBLS Butter

Melt together the chocolate chips and the shortening over low heat until smooth.  Using either a silicone mini muffin pan or a mini muffin pan lined with mini muffin liners, drizzle about half of the melted chocolate into each cup, making sure to drag or brush it up the sides of each.  Put pan into the freezer for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, melt together the peanut butter and butter until smooth and remove from heat.  Take frozen chocolate cups from the freezer and divide the peanut butter into each cup then top with the remaining melted chocolate.

Place pan back into the freezer for at least 2 more hours then remove the chocolates from the muffin liners.  Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator.

Nutrition Information (Per 1 Peanut Butter Cup)

  • 66  Calories
  • 1.45 g  Fat
  • 4 g  Carbs
  • 1.3 g  Protein