Fall Off the Bone Beef Ribs

My husband loves a meaty beef rib, but our grocery store rarely has them and, if they do, they have been previously frozen.  So, you can probably guess, I was pretty excited to find a single slab of freshly cut beef ribs while grabbing some last minute Easter dinner supplies this past Sunday.

We eat pretty healthy during the week, so it’ll be a surprise tonight when he gets a weekday treat of a hearty meal of meat and potatoes.

Fall Off the Bone Beef Ribs

  • 2 Pounds Beef Ribs cut apart at the bones (6-8 Bones)
  • 3 Blood Oranges – 2 peeled/1 sliced (with skin on)
  • 1 Granny Smith Apple, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1/4 Medium Yellow Onion, chopped
  • 2 Cans Stoli Ginger Beer
  • 1/4 Cup Lower Sodium Soy Sauce
  • 2 Cloves Garlic chopped
  • 2 TBLS Olive Oil

Prepare the ribs

  • With the lid open, heat the pressure cooker to the Brown setting
  • Put the oil, garlic and chopped onion into the pressure cooker and cook until onion becomes translucent (about 5 minutes).
  • Add the sliced apples, the 2 whole/peeled blood oranges, the sliced orange (with peel on), the soy sauce and the entire contents of both cans of ginger beer.
  • Cook until mixture comes just to a boil.
  • Place the sectioned ribs into the pan – they do not need to be completely submerged.
  • Close and lock the lid.
  • Set to cook on high pressure.  When pressure is reached, cook ribs for 50 minutes.
  • When the cycle is complete, unplug the pressure cooker and allow the unit to return to equal pressure for about 15 minutes, then manually release the remaining steam and open the lid.
  • Using tongs, remove the ribs (the meat should be barely holding on) to a 9 x 11 Pyrex baking dish.

ribs2ribs3ribs1Prepare the sauce for the ribs

  • Using a fat separator (see how to video here) with the stopper firmly pushed into the spout, pour the remaining juices from the pressure cooker pan through the strainer/lid.  If strainer becomes too full, take it off the cup portion and throw the contents of the strainer away – you don’t need them anymore.  Continue straining the juices until the pressure cooker is empty.  I strain mine twice (by pouring from separator back into the cooking pan then re-straining) to catch any chunks that might have been missed.
  • Pour contents of fat separator into a small saucepan.
  • Over medium high heat, bring juices to a low boil.
  • Add 1/2 tsp Dried Red Pepper Flakes.
  • Add 1/2 Cup Packed Brown Sugar.
  • Combine 3 TBLS Cornstarch with just enough Cold Water to make a smooth syrup.
  • Whisking constantly, slowly pour the cornstarch mixture into the boiling juices.
  • Return to a full rolling boil (whisking constantly) and then allow to boil for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes then remove from heat.

Finish the ribs

  • Using a ladle, pour a generous amount of the sauce (but not all of it) over the ribs in the pan.
  • Cover the pan with foil and put ribs in the oven on low heat (250°F) until you are about 30 minutes from eating.
  • When you are about 30 minutes from eating, remove the pan from the oven, remove the foil and turn oven temperature up to 450°F.
  • Return the uncovered ribs to the oven and bake about 10 minutes to allow the sauce to adhere more solidly to the meat.

I’m serving the ribs with garlic mashed potatoes and carrot/pineapple slaw.  Heat the reserved sauce in the microwave until warm and bring to the table to serve with the ribs.

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That Goes Where?

I’ve never poisoned anyone with my cooking (that I am aware of), but I just found out that I have been storing some food items in places they aren’t supposed to be stored.

  • Apples:   They stay crisper in the refrigerator and last longer without spoiling.  Hmmm, ok.  Good thing to know, but I usually don’t buy more than a few apples at a time and keep them on the counter.  My house is always cool and I like them visible, making me more likely to eat one than grab a cookie or chips…I’m going to call this one a toss up.
  • Brown Sugar:  WOO HOO!  I’m storing this one right.  It belongs in the cupboard in a well sealed bag or container, not in the refrigerator.  I also saw a tip that it will stay softer/fresher longer if you put a couple of big marshmallows in the same container.
  • Coffee:  Beans will keep in an airtight container, open bag or can at room temperature for a week.  My Mom always kept her cans of coffee in the refrigerator.  Apparently that was wrong as moisture can kill the flavor making the coffee taste weak.  I keep my beans in the freezer, which is recommended for long term storage.  Yes!!!  Another staple I’m not screwing up!
  • Spices:  I am guilty of keeping spices much longer than I should, but at least I am storing them right. They belong in a cupboard away from heat ( so not one above the refrigerator or oven), light, and moisture to keep the oils from breaking down.  Exceptions are sesame seeds and poppy seeds, which need the moisture of the refrigerator to maintain their freshness. Toasted or plain sesame oil should be stored in the refrigerator as well.
  • Hot Sauce:  No need to keep them in the refrigerator.  They will stay good (and potent) for up to 3 years in the cupboard at room temperature.  Cool, I get to free up some refrigerator space.
  • Maple Syrup:  The expensive pure stuff needs to go in the refrigerator, the Aunt Jemima  (and other artificial Maple flavored syrups) is the cupboard.  Guess I have a new resident for those recently vacated refrigerator shelves!
  • Nuts:  Oops, I’ve been storing these wrong.  Almonds, walnuts and pecans are only good (once jar or bag is opened) at room temperature for two weeks.  To maintain the freshness of the oils within them, store in refrigerator up to 9 months and freezer up to 2 years.
  • Onions, Shallots, Garlic:  Don’t do as my mom did and store them in the refrigerator.  These need to be stored in a mesh bag or basket in a dry place with plenty of room for air to circulate.
  • Tomatoes:  Yep, I’ve been doing these a disservice too!  Tomatoes do not belong in the refrigerator, they’ll get mushy.  Put them on the cool counter.

Who knew?  Certainly not this girl!

Are you on Facebook?  You might be interested in the things I may not devote an entire blog post to: recipes, food facts, nutritional information, photos and other things that make my mouth water. I may not write a blog post every day, but there are daily updates to my This Girl Loves To Eat community at: https://www.facebook.com/ThisGirlLovesHerFood